361 Kinghorn to Queensferry – The Magnificent Forth Bridges

6 comments
Fife, Scotland

Date of walk: 24/10/19

Under the railway, Kinghorn, Fife, Scotland.

The Forth Crossings above Burntisland Beach, Fife, Scotland.

Under the railway, Burntisland, Fife, Scotland.

The Forth Crossings from Burntisland Beach, Fife, Scotland.

Burntisland, Fife, Scotland.

Scott Pallets, Burntisland, Fife, Scotland.

Kingdom Amusements, Burntisland, Fife, Scotland.

Craigkelly transmitting station with the coast train, Aberdour, Fife, Scotland.

Thistle finial, Aberdour, Fife, Scotland.

Fire Tug practice, Firth of Forth, Fife, Scotland.

Centre of the gates leading to St Colme House, Aberdour, Fife, Scotland.

Gas silo, Braefoot Bay Marine Terminal, Fife, Scotland.

St Colm’s Abbey, Built in 1223, Inchcolm, Fife, Scotland.

Braefoot Oil Terminal, Fife, Scotland.

Queensferry crossing above North Queensferry I, Fife, Scotland.

St Bridget’s Kirk I, built in 1100s, Fife, Scotland.

Queensferry crossing above North Queensferry II, Fife, Scotland.

St Bridget’s Kirk II, Fife, Scotland.

Graveyard, St Bridget’s Kirk, Fife, Scotland.

Under the Forth Bridge, North Queensferry, Fife, Scotland.

The Forth Bridge from North Queensferry, Fife, Scotland.

The Forth Bridge catches the evening light from North Queensferry, Fife, Scotland.

North Queensferry house with the Forth Bridge, Fife, Scotland.

Lattice love, Forth Bridge, North Queensferry, Fife, Scotland.

The Queensferry Crossing, built 2011-2017, is the longest three-tower cable-stayed bridge in the world at 2.7km long, Scotland.

Criss Cross I. Queensferry crossing, Scotland.

The Queensferry Crossing at dusk, Scotland.

Criss Cross II. Queensferry crossing, Scotland.

Central Tower, Queensferry Crossing, Scotland.

Criss Cross III. Queensferry crossing, Scotland.

The Queensferry Crossing (with plane), Scotland.

Underpass towards Queensferry, Scotland.

The Forth Bridge from South Queensferry at dusk, Scotland.

Blocked off access to Burntisland Beach ‘for residents only’.

I won’t be camping here then!

Waking up next to an icon.

Making porridge at camp below the Forth Bridge.

Camp by the Firth of Forth at Queensferry, Scotland.

By the Firth of Forth.

St Bridget’s Kirk by the Firth of Forth.
Seriously impressive to be up close and personal to the Forth Bridge.
The Forth Bridge in glorious evening light from North Queensferry.
For four years and 362 days of walking I’ve dreamt of walking across the Firth of Forth and tonight I did.
The pedestrian way across the Forth is via the Road Bridge, the middle of the three crossings.
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British Architectural & Landscape Photographer.

6 thoughts on “361 Kinghorn to Queensferry – The Magnificent Forth Bridges”

  1. kevan hubbard says:

    Crammond Island 🏝️ might be a good place to camp around there but I think that kids might get on to it to drink?It was peaceful and uninhabited when I was there but I didn’t try to bunk down on it.The life boat nearby has the nickname of the Crammond Island Ferry due to getting people off the tidal island when the tide comes up! Probably best just to leave them there until low tide and they can walk back to Crammond which is sort of a village on the edge of Edinburgh.

  2. Enjoyed seeing this area because I lived in South Queensferry -‘The Ferry’ – for over 20 years. We had a view over the two original bridges but left before the second road bridge was built. Haven’t been back to see it yet, but from your photographs it looks both elegant and impressive.

    • That must have been a great place to live. Yes the new bridge manages to hold its own against the rail bridge which is quite an achievement!

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