Day 203: Woodhall to Inchinnan – Span & Pulse

25 comments
Renfrewshire, Scotland

Timber Ponds and Dumbarton Castle. Dating from the 18th century the ponds functioned as storage for timber from North America prior to its sale to local ship yards. Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds I, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds II, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds III, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds IV, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds V, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds VI, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds VII, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds VIII, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds IX, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds X, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Timber Ponds XI, Kelburn, Inverclyde, Scotland.

Dumbarton Castle across the Clyde I, the castle has the longest recorded history of any stronghold in Scotland dating back to the 5th century, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Clyde Reflections I, Old Kilpatrick from Erskine Park, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Dumbarton Castle across the Clyde II, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Clyde Reflections II, Old Kilpatrick from Erskine Park, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge I, bult 1967-71 and designed by engineer Dr William Brown, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge II, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge III, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge IV, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge V, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge VI, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge VII, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge VIII, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Erskine Bridge IX, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Kingsway Court, Scotstoun with Glasgow University Tower in the distance, from Erskine, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Dalmuir Sewage Works from Erskine, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Dalmuir warehouses from Erskine, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Clyde Pylon, Erskine, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

Fusion cuisine, Bishopton.

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British Architectural & Landscape Photographer.

25 thoughts on “Day 203: Woodhall to Inchinnan – Span & Pulse”

    • At King George V Bridge, I wanted to go into the heart of Glasgow even though according to my ‘rules’ I could have crossed the Erskine and bypassed the city

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  1. Some beautiful views there and very good photos of those timber ponds. Some wonderful reflections on those ones especially.

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  2. I love seeing all these wide open spaces through your camera lens. The sights lift my spirit as I sit at my cramped writing desk. BTW, I read Alexander McCall Smith and was tickled to spot, in your photograph above, cans and bottles of Irn Bru. McCall Smith has made me understand that this is THE treat for Scottish children.

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    • It certainly is and not just for kids, Irn Bru is a Scottish cultural icon. There was recently an outrage when it was announced the recipe was changing to reduce the sugar content – folks were stockpiling the original. Scotland is one of the only countries that Coca Cola isn’t the best selling soft drink! Glad you enjoyed the open space.

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  3. Pete says:

    I bet you could of spent hours photographing those timber posts… lovely light and images

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Been following your blog for awhile now, but never commented before. Have to this time. There are some stunning pics here. I hope it was a good day for you and that you enjoyed taking them as much as I enjoyed seeing them. Timber Ponds VI is an absolute gem. Brilliant!

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    • Yes, days like this are what make the whole endeavour worthwhile. I was pretty listless when I started the day but the beauty and fascination with what I was witnessing made me forget my body until I collapsed weary and happy into bed. Thanks for pointing out your favourite, mine too as it’s the very most abstract and looks like a form of calligraphy, In the print you can see the seaweed close up.

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