Day 324: Wick to Whaligoe – Herring, Trinkie & The Sinclair Mausoleum

3 comments
Caithness, Scotland

Date of walk: 10/8/2019

The distinctive wide and squat chimney stack of many buildings around Wick, North Head, Caithness, Scotland.

North Head, Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

Milky sea, Wick Bay, Caithness, Scotland.

North Baths, Outdoor swimming pool, Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

Wick Harbour entrance through the mist, Caithness, Scotland.

Wick Herring Market, Caithness, Scotland.

Fisherman’s huts, Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

North Pier, Wick Harbour, Caithness, Scotland.

Mooring lines, Wick Harbour, Caithness, Scotland.

Old Lifeboat Station, Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

The Trinkie I, Outdoor swimming pool, Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

The Trinkie II, Outdoor swimming pool, Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

The Trinkie III, Outdoor swimming pool, Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

Succession of headlands south of Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

The Castle Of Old Wick, constructed in the 12th century, by Harald Maddadson, Jarl of Caithness and Orkney, Scotland.

The North Sea meets the cliffs near the Castle of Old Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

The Castle Of Old Wick, Caithness, Scotland.

Girston Bay and Dunbar’s Stack, Caithness, Scotland.

Cliff edge towards Dunbar’s Stack, Caithness, Scotland.

Dunbar’s Stack, Caithness, Scotland.

Cliffline above Ires Geo, Caithness, Scotland.

Waterfall, Riera Geo, Caithness, Scotland.

The Sinclair Mausoleum built 1700, St. Martin’s Chapel and Burial Ground, Ulbster Caithness, Scotland.

Hearth in the Sinclair Mausoleum at the Mains of Ulbster, Caithness, Scotland.

The Mains of Ulbster. Built late 18th – early 19th century. A listed building due to historic association with the Sinclairs of Ulbster. Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster was a British politician, a writer on both finance and agriculture, and the first person to use the word statistics in the English language, in his vast, pioneering work, Statistical Account of Scotland, in 21 volumes. Caithness, Scotland.

Kitchen with a framed lintel of 17th century chimney piece with centre coat of arms of Sinclairs of Ulbster (probably from earlier house on site), Mains of Ulbster, Caithness, Scotland.

Front door, The Mains of Ulbster, Caithness, Scotland.

Stairwell, The Mains of Ulbster, Caithness, Scotland.

Corridor, The Mains of Ulbster, Caithness, Scotland.

Mausoleum at Mains of Ulbster with the North Sea, Caithness, Scotland.

Herring Fleet with the schooner Elba in Wick Harbour (Photo: 1883, Johnston Collection).

Gutter lassies in James More’s Yard with the Lifeboat shed in the background. The women could gut and sort the fish by size at the rate of 40 in a minute. (Photo: 1910-19, Johnston Collection)

Wick Harbour in busy times (Photo: 1912, Johnston Collection).

Wick Harbour, 1865.

Wick Harbour 2019.

The castle of Old Wick in the 1160s.

Lichen encrusted path marker for the John O’Groats Trail.

Sourcing water was tricky here (as the streams run through agricultural land). I resorted to using garden taps when there were no occupied buildings nearby.

A pile of human bones exposed inside one of the window cills in The Sinclair Mausoleum.

The Trinkie outdoor pool near Wick.
Old Wick Castle.
Ruined house above Ires Geo.
Waterfall, Riera Geo, Caithness, Scotland.
The Sinclair Mausoleum, Ulbster.
Inside the Mains of Ulbster.
The Mains of Ulbster.
The Mains of Ulbster and The Sinclair Mausoleum.
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3 thoughts on “Day 324: Wick to Whaligoe – Herring, Trinkie & The Sinclair Mausoleum”

  1. kevan hubbard says:

    I’ve read,well it was about the Shetlands but it’d be the same in the Orkneys and northern Mainland, that those fish gutting women generally weren’t locals but Gaels from the Hebrides who would travel the the east seasonally and many of them couldn’t speak English.Regarding Wick’s outdoor pool you’d have to be brave although my sister swam in an outdoor pool in Rekjavik in October but it was probably heated by volcanic activity.

  2. Pingback: Day 326: Borgue to Lothmore – Badbea Clearance Village | The Perimeter

Whether you have comments on the photos, some knowledge or a personal story on this area you’d like to share, or you’ve spotted a typo or error, I’d love to hear your thoughts.