Day 329: Balnagal to Tarrel – The Pictish Dragon Stone

4 comments
Ross-shire - East, Scotland

Date of walk: 16/8/19

Inver Bar near Portmahomack. This tranquil scene was accompanied by a pair of circling Eurofighter Typhoons repeatedly strafing the nearby bombing range at Tain, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Bladderwrack, Portmahomack, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Portmahomack I, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Tarbat Old Parish Church now Tarbat Discovery Centre, Portmahomack, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Detail of the gorgeous interlocking spiral design surrounding the Pictish Dragon Stone dating from the 8th century and excavated in 1997. Tarbat Discovery Centre in Tarbat Old Parish Church, Portmahomack, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Portmahomack Harbour, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Portmahomack II, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Garden, Tarbat peninsula, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

A faint rainbow from Tarbat Ness, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

The Duke of Sutherland Monument from Tarbat Ness, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Cranium and upper jaw of a Sperm Whale washed ashore in 2013, Tarbat Ness, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Sutherland from Tarbat Ness, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Tarbat Ness Lighthouse: the full stop at the end of the tongue of land where the great glen, the geological fault that divides the Highlands in two, meets the sea. Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Shoreline at Tarbat Ness, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Tarbat Ness Lighthouse II, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Tarbat Ness Lighthouse III, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Barley, Tarbat peninsula, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Tarbat Ness Lighthouse IV, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Microwave antenna mast, Easter Bindal, Tarbat peninsula, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Microwave antenna tower with gulls, Easter Bindal, Tarbat peninsula, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Crossing paths, Tarbat Ness, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Ballone Castle, built in the 16th century, restored in the 1990’s, Tarbat peninsula, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Flock, Tarbat Ness, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

When the garden isn’t quite large enough to house your gnome collection

An original view of the Highlands that really highlights the Great Glen fault running vertically up the centre of the map, from Fort William, past Inverness and terminating in the Tarbat peninsula. Map by Alasdair Rae with Ordnance Survey Data.

Camp Near Tarrel, Ross & Cromarty, Scotland.

Tarbat Ness Lighthouse and the Dornoch Firth.
Tarbat Ness Lighthouse.
Walking beside fields of barley of the Tarbat peninsula.
Waving barley with Tarbat Ness Lighthouse.
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British Architectural & Landscape Photographer.

4 thoughts on “Day 329: Balnagal to Tarrel – The Pictish Dragon Stone”

  1. kevan hubbard says:

    That Japanese garden looks very therapeutic but I’d imagine that the noise of the military jets might break your meditations some?We have a terrible problem with them, fighter jets not meditation gardens, over the north Pennines and North Yorkshire Moors National Park and the noise is cruel.Still they might get to play their games for real with Vladimir Putin shortly?Noise pollution, like light pollution, isn’t taken seriously yet it causes major environmentally and psychological damage.I recently wrote to my MP asking why off road motorbikes, leasure quad bikes,jet skis,etc are legal given you can’t buy a pit bull terrier,flick knife,air gun over 12 foot pounds energy,over 10 percent sulphuric acid and given that the government know full well most will be used to tear up our countryside and seas.You guessed it fobbed off!

    • To be fair there are very few places off trail bikes can ride in the UK. I’ve seen far more damage to bridleways done by mountain bikes!

  2. Stunning photos as always. You manage to pick out some wonderful details that I seem to manage to miss. I didn’t realise Tarbet Ness was (for me, going north) where I entered the highlands.

    • Thanks! What a different experience you must have had going anti-clockwise! I wouldn’t have realised The Glen Great fault reached to here either but someone pointed it out when I posted pictures from here on Twitter.

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