Day 184: Cardoness Castle to Newton Stewart – Neolithic & Logistic

11 comments
Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland

Cairnholy I, Neolithic chambered tomb, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Cairnholy I, portal stones, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Cairnholy I, Curving façade and Wigtown Bay, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Track to Cairnholy, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Cairnholy II, portal stones, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Cairnholy II, Neolithic chambered tomb, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Cairnholy II, portal stones and chambered tomb, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Ben John from Fleet Bay, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Kirkmabreck Quarry Quay, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Flock above the River Cree, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Winter dusk, Wigtown, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Monument to the Ninth Earl Of Galloway, Newton Stewart, Dumfries

Monument to the Ninth Earl Of Galloway, Newton Stewart, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

Bridge of Cree at dusk, Newton Stewart, Dumfries and Galloway, S

Bridge of Cree at dusk, Newton Stewart, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland.

After three wet nights in the tent, staying here was a cherished contrast – thanks for putting me up Joseph! Kirkdale House is a local granite Georgian Villa designed by pre-eminent classical revival architect Robert Adam for the Hannay family in 1789.

Joseph Proskauer, who has come to Cairnholy for sunrise almost every day for nine years, shares with me some its secrets describing the chambered cairn as a “finely tuned instrument”.

 

Dodging the constant stream of Stranrear ferry lorries for hours along the A75 wasn’t much fun but there was a truck stop cafe to compensate.

Jaunty tartan packaging for these mackerel from the Galloway Smokehouse which I devoured by the river Cree as the sun was setting.

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British Architectural & Landscape Photographer.

11 thoughts on “Day 184: Cardoness Castle to Newton Stewart – Neolithic & Logistic”

  1. Quintin, Huge congratulations on reaching the 50% marker. Latest photos are quite wonderful, even so considering the weather conditions. Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Joseph says:

    Counterpoint of wings (wild and architectural) . . . An honor and a pleasure to have you as a guest in one. (The Solway snow serpent arrived in the same storm you did — rippling right below your window.)

    Centre and periphery — one of Cairn Holy’s motifs. Three instruments, each resonating with what’s around: cairn; world; participating observer. That day, one in particular was in peak condition and accord — bringing experience of the periphery to the cairn, and vice versa. (In his hands, a camera, too, becomes more than mere machine.)

    Thomas Carlyle is said to have told Queen Victoria that the coast road along this stretch was the most beautiful in her Kingdom. (Had he seen it blanketed in snow?) As you’ve encountered, along with spans of beauty, parts of the current road may be among the most dangerous in the realm (not only for pedestrians). Glad you got through to somewhere safe, dry, and warm!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for your generosity and poetic insights.
      There is something quietly monumental about your daily communing with these ancient stones.

      Like

  3. I love the winter dusk shot of Wigtown. What a relief it must have been to spend a night indoors and in such style after nights in the tent. Enjoying this journey so much, thank you. I really look forward to your posts – keep going!

    Like

  4. Joe says:

    More fabulous photos- just quite remarkable and really pleased to see you stayed safe in the weather we’ve just had. The birds 🦅 are just mesmerising!
    Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Harris says:

    I visited Cairn Holy in summer and found the location very inspiring with far reaching views. I could understand why it was used as a burial site. It was interesting to see both it and the nearby area in the snow. Your photos of the Solway coast are very beautiful.

    Like

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