Day 215: Tighnabruaich to Glenan Bay – Texture & Tone

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Argyllshire - South, Scotland

United States Air Force Lockheed C-130 Hercules over the Isle of Bute, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Lichen, Asgog Bay, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Cone covered, Tighnabruaich, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Arran from Ardlamont Bay, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Kilbride bay texture I, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Arran from Kilbride Bay I, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Kilbride bay texture II, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Arran from Kilbride Bay II, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Sea Pink I, Asgog Bay, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Arran from Salann Bay, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Sea Pink II, Asgog Bay, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Rough foreshore walking near Portavadie, Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Date of walk: 8/6/2018

Farewell to amazing hosts Karmen & Gabor after a much needed rest at Tregortha B&B, Tighnabruaich.

Panoramic view of the Isle of Arran from Ardlamont bay.

The barnacle covered foreshore is gratifyingly non-slip

Some locals aren’t the greatest conversationalists

These kind of signs and blockages are still quite frequent despite the 2003 Land Reform Act (the right to roam). Not the easiest gate to climb with a backpack but the alternative was a 4km detour.

Grasslike lichen – the air must be so clean here.

You can run but you can’t hide

Camp at Glenan Bay

 

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British Architectural & Landscape Photographer.

6 thoughts on “Day 215: Tighnabruaich to Glenan Bay – Texture & Tone”

  1. Those midges … ugh!!! Hopefully they’ll disappear as the weather cools! Your photos are stunning: you’re like Ben Pentreath – you see the things we all see, you just see them with a better eye. 🙂

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    • I’m posting a few months after the event – they did reduce, but due to it being too hot for them! they are back in full force now. Thanks

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  2. Joseph Proskauer says:

    Wings at lochside — big and small. Which are more unwelcome?
    Ah, the pulse of life: we don’t all get the chance to immerse in some aspects so closely & continuously!
    .
    .’
    .’.
    .’:`.
    .’:*,;`.
    .’:*” -+~ ^,;`.
    .’:*§@=>”-+~^<±#&,;`.
    .':*"-+~^,;`.
    .':*,;`.
    .';`.
    .`.
    `.
    .

    Since you're with 'em: What's their rhythm?
    Are they in tune with Sun and Moon?
    Overnighting — when's first biting?
    Evening, again — how many? when?
    When do they come? And for how long —
    til they peak, diminish, and are gone!?

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    • Joseph Proskauer says:

      At Cairn Holy, during high season, there’s often a surge — from nothing to infestation — the moment the sun sinks behind the western ridge; this may be followed by another pulse as it sets on the distant horizon (beyond the ridge) an hour later. Morning rhythms are less clear to me. (If I got up and out early enough . . . ) The strength and duration of each wave lengthens . . . then subsides . . . til . . . ?

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