Day 295: Badrallach to Coire nan Cnaimhean – The Scoraig Peninsula 

9 comments
Ross-shire - West, Scotland

Date of walk: 21/4/19

Little Loch Broom emerging as the sun melts the fog away, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Dundonnell, Little Loch Broom. Wester Ross, Scotland.

Morning band of sea fog I, Little Loch Broom, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Misty morning, Little Loch Broom, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Morning band of sea fog II, Little Loch Broom, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Creag na Ceapaich, Little Loch Broom. Wester Ross, Scotland.

Camusnagaul, Little Loch Broom, Wester Ross, Scotland.

The path to Scoraig I, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Annat, Scoraig, Wester Ross, Scotland.

The path to Scoraig II (the only way to to the settlement other than by boat) above the cliffs, Wester Ross, Scotland.

The path to Scoraig III, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Hairy fence post, Scoraig, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Wind turbine II, Scoraig, Wester Ross, Scotland.

By the pier, Scoraig, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Wind turbine I, Scoraig, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Cailleach Head Lighthouse, Scoraig peninsula, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Beinn Ghobhlach on the pathless north side of the Scoraig peninsula, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Annat, Scoraig, Wester Ross, Scotland.

CalMac Ferry heading to Ullapool, Loch Broom, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Scoraig peninsula and the Summer Isles, Wester Ross, Scotland.

CalMac Ferry, MV Loch Seaforth on route to Stornoway from Ullapool in front of Ben Mor Coigach, Loch Broom, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Scoraig peninsula and the Summer Isles II, Wester Ross, Scotland.

Scoraig peninsula and the Summer Isles I, Wester Ross, Scotland.

 

I wasn’t expecting any facilities in Scoraig so the self-service Carnosh Beag Café which operate on the principle of “eat what you like, pay what you like” was a pleasant surprise!

Info, Carnosh Beag Café.

Having to bring everything in by water hasn’t deterred the ingenious Scoraig residents.

The end of a good day overlooking the Summer Isles from the Scoraig peninsula.

>

A handy boulder (an erratic i’m guessing) for my tabletop tripod overlooking the Summer Isles.

Camp on the Scoraig peninsula at Coire nan Cnaimhea above the Summer Isles.

The path to Scoraig by Little Loch Broom.
The path to Scoraig.
The path to Scoraig above the cliffs.
Most of the houses in Scoraig are powered by wind turbines like these which are scattered around the community.
The lovely Loch Camas an Lochain on the Scoraig peninsula.
Horses at Annat, Scoraig.
No paths on this section around the North of the Scoraig peninsula.
The end of a good day overlooking the Summer Isles from the Scoraig peninsula.
One-Time
Monthly
Yearly

The Perimeter is a labour of love: it’s taken 454 days of walking, hundreds of hours of planning and thousands of hours of editing. If you have the means, I’d appreciate your support by buying a print or contributing so I can continue to share the project with you.

Make a monthly donation

Make a yearly donation

Choose an amount

£2.00
£5.00
£25.00
£2.00
£5.00
£25.00
£2.00
£5.00
£25.00

Or enter a custom amount

£

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

DonateDonate monthlyDonate yearly
Posted by

British Architectural & Landscape Photographer.

9 thoughts on “Day 295: Badrallach to Coire nan Cnaimhean – The Scoraig Peninsula ”

  1. kevan hubbard says:

    At least the cafe notice didn’t mention Herr Flick!I have, today, examined how comfortable it would be to sleep in one of those WW2 block houses you visited and I conclude not very! There’s one near my village in north east England and I walked up to it today and the rain,a westerly,had wet all of the inside through the gun ports.This one has it’s way in on the roof.I suppose in summer you could sleep in it but it’s very close to a nuclear power station so you could get an overnight visit from a strange police force with an almost Dixon of Dock Green title; the Civil Nuclear Constabulary….the quaint name belies the fact that it a heavily armed force,look like 5.56mm rifles and I’d guess 9mm pistols when I’ve seen them but obviously avoided asking what calibre guns they packed!So I’ll think that I’ll avoid the many free concrete bothies that litter the coast!

      • kevan hubbard says:

        I live in Seaton Carew just 5km north of that spot!The WW2 block house is just west of your tent by about 500m..As to tips where you should have pitched your tent there’s a tidal island just east of that point,the sand dunes near Seaton Carew or for more comfort depending on the time of year and how early the local bird watchers get up there’s a bird watching hut to the east of the Seaton Carew to Port Clarence road along a path east of the Greatham Creek bridge at Seal Sands.The CNC are a none Home Office force, the best known of those being the British Transport Police,you also have MOD police not to be confused with Military Police.They are the 3 big none Home Office police and you have other small ones like Mersey Tunnel,Dock police, Hampstead Heath police,etc..I have had 3 interactions with the CNC and only one where I felt that they had acted in a wrongish way which was when they stopped me walking up the public byway from the Seaton Carew to Port Clarence road and that was just before the England Coast Path officially opened to ask what I was doing ….on a public right of way!I didn’t want to get into an argument with them but I did point out that they where not stopping dog walkers cars and that cars could carry bombs, RPG’s, surveillance equipment much better than a person on foot with a little day sack!I suggested that we live in a motocracy and that they where discriminating against people who don’t drive…. which is true!The other two interactions where less exciting,sort of,one rather mundane they where looking for a lost person and just ask me if I’d seen him.The other was in June this year when I found a dead body on the beach!And obviously rang the Coastguard and the CNC where the first responders followed by the Coastguard and Cleveland Police.I believe that the poor fellow had jumped in the sea about 2 weeks before from reports I read later.

      • Interesting tips and interactions. I did consider the island but it wasn’t so good for photography of the refinery. Hope finding the body didn’t haunt you, I got the impression a lot of desperate souls end up here after talking with the CNC. We certainly do live in a motocracy – thought that many times son this journey!

  2. Johnny says:

    Lovely photos!
    It reminds me of the time, back in the late 1980s, when I visited to try to help with improving the telephone service to Scoraig, which at the time was provided by a submarine cable across the loch.

  3. Johnny says:

    Good question! I don’t know, but I would guess they probably still have some sort of cabling from the local exchange.
    Hopefully one day I will go back and find out.

  4. John says:

    I’m sure here in the states there’s many places like in your photos. The erie quality of your work intrigue’s me and do hope someday soon before it is beyond me to come and take some of these walks of yours.

    • Eerie is the correct word when the weather changes so fast. Hope you can make it over soon. I want to hike the PCT some day.

Leave a Reply to Johnny Cancel reply